Articles by tag: think

Articles by tag: think

    Robot On a Hoverboard - Try 1

    Robot On a Hoverboard - Try 1 By Caitlin, Max, Tycho, Darshan, Omar, Evan, Ethan, and Jayesh

    Task: Try to drive the hoverboard with the competition bot

    In the middle of Saturday's event we decided it would be a GREAT idea to put the competiton robot on the hoverboard and try to drive it around. Theoretically if we got it centered correctly it could only drive forward and backwards. We could extend the cliff hanger to move our center of gravity forwards, and then retract to bring it back.

    Reflections

    We were able to make the board speed up by tilting the cliff-hanger out and extending it, but we couldn't control it enough to completely stop it or keep it steady. We believe that the robot frame isn't completely rigid and is torquing at the center, making the robot unbalanced left/right. Since it's only slightly off balance we can't really adjust it by hand. It seems doomed to drive in circles forever. We tried to turn the robot to a correct alignment by driving with the main treads a little, but the change in center of gravity was too dramatic. The robot quickly veered into Evan, who was sitting nearby.

    Day 2 of iMake

    Day 2 of iMake By Caitlin, Max, Tycho, and Omar

    Task: Continue presenting at iMake

    Day 1 was a huge success, and we carried that over into the Sunday presentations too. There were a lot of common questions we noticed from Saturday, including levels of robotics competitions and the LEGO EV3 system, and we were able to answer these with more clarity after hearing them so often. A few papers were set up on our table outlining the various FIRST competition levels. These helped us easily reference the multiple acronyms FIRST uses for everything, which can be confusing to anyone who hasn't known and competed under them since they were 11 years old.

    Reflections

    Like Saturday, we interacted with what felt like a constant stream of people. Many were families with kids in elementary and middle school with varying experience in robotics. Some kids had competed in FLL or knew those who had, while others hadn't heard of the systems before. The balancing bot "Gyro Boy" was a good attention grabber when the main FTC bot wasn't doing anything, and it was helpful to compare the two, how Gyro Boy used graphical programming and was completely autonomous, while the main bot used a text language but was controlled by a driver. This almost immediately prompted the kids to ask if they could drive, and Omar showed them the ropes. Younger kids were only shown the drive controls, while the older ones could be taught some of the more interesting tape measure commands. Since the hand was still taped onto the cliff hook many took the opportunity to wave to their siblings and gave high fives to anyone near. However, the robot seemed to be disconnecting more often than it had Saturday, and was hidden to the side so it wouldn't be asked about.

    When we brought out Argos, the color following robot, it seemed like every other volunteer took a minute or two to pick up the target and watch the camera follow the movements. Tycho, Max, and Omar traded off on the controls and occasionally let Argos drive too, in order to show how he could back up when too close, and catch up when lagging. It had taken us the beginning of the day to fix the phone mount, but the extra effort was definitely worth it. However unwieldy Argos may be (he is definitely suited to outdoor/large open area events) he is definitely a crowd pleaser.

    Hoverboards and PID

    Hoverboards and PID By Caitlin, Omar, Darshan, Tycho, and Max

    Task: Continue with the Hoverboard and tweak PID

    After the long weekend last week, today was a reasonably relaxed practice. We decided that we could work on anything, as long we stayed focused. The two main foci were the -Robot on a Hoverboard- and fine tuning our PID for autonomous.

    Reflections

    We experimented with balancing the robot more evenly on the hoverboard to keep it on a straight path and then getting creative with the controls to speed it up. We found that we could effectively rocket it forward by extending and angling the cliff climber while flipping the block dispenser forward at the same time. While it was easy to send the robot forward, there was little we could do to recover outside of just pushing it back by hand. This created a game of hot potato as we passed the robot around from person to person, but was ended rather abruptly when it careened into the table.

    If we're going to get our autonomous functional for UIL then we need to fix our PID. We used the parts of the current autonomous demo to check the straight line gyro drive, and went from barely correcting, to crazy oscillations, to a good level in between. This took a decent amount of tweaking for K-proportional, and when we felt we were straddling the line between too much and too little correction we messed around with K-Derivative to be better prepared. After the initial gyro guided line the robot is programmed to do a 45 degree turn towards the beacon, and then fine tune its angle using color blob. The color blob detection seemed to track the selected color accurately, outlining the area in neon green, but for some reason didn't turn to aim at it. If anything it turned away from the beacon. We found a mistake in our error calculation, where leftover error wasn't properly cleared before the guided turn, that we believe caused at least some of the odd turning behavior.

    Turn Up! at Frontiers of Flight with DCOL

    Turn Up! at Frontiers of Flight with DCOL By Janavi, Darshan, Jayesh, Caitlin, Max, Tycho, Omar, and Austin

    Inspiring 1,000 People to Turn Up with STEM

    Written by Janavi Chadha

    The Dallas City of Learning Organization held a Turn Up event at the Frontiers of Flight Museum, where we staffed the Mobile XPerience (MXP) complete with laptops, 3D printers, and LEGO SumoBots. Outside the vehicle, Caitlin and I taught kids how to create 3D models of houses using SketchUp. Then we let the kids bring their designs to life by designing and 3D-Printing keychains.

    On board Max managed the bank of four 3D printers while Tycho and Austin taught kids to build virtual structures on our Minecraft server with the education version of the software.

    Out to the side of the MXP, we set up a ring for the sumo lego robots to battle in, teaching the kids how robots can be programmed to react to the world around them. Jayesh, Omar and Darshan manned that station and also demonstrated our FTC competition robot.

    Omar ran minion (our robot walking companion) around the museum Pied-Piper fashion, leading kids back to our activity stations in and around the vehicle. On the way he taught kids to operate the robot with its touch and rotation sensor based leash. At one point he took minion over to challenge the airport's 700lb bomb disposal robot. That robot was not impressed.

    A few more pics of the MXP in the museum while we are striking the exhibit:

    Person-hours note: The night before Max and Tycho spent 5 hours getting the vehicle ready.

    MXP Transportation

    MXP Transportation By Darshan, Caitlin, Jayesh, Omar, Ethan, Evan, Janavi, Tycho, and Max

    Oh the places you'll go!

    We attend many events throughout the DFW area, taking our robot and whatever else we need along with us. This has often puts a strain in how much we can actually bring with us to FIRST events and STEM events in general. Over this past summer the team helped refurbish an old 90s RV to use as a Mobile Tech XPerience to drive around and help bring STEM to kids. Since the team put in the work to revamp the RV and worked so closely with the nonprofits involved, Big Thought gave us first dibs at using it when it's not out on deployments during the weekends. The MXP gives us a way to transport us and our materials to places that would otherwise seem unlikely. We can also use the MXP in collaboration with DISD to fund trips out of state and other competitions.

    With the MXP at our disposal, bringing it to events can not only provide benefits to ourselves but also to other kids and teams. Plus it looks cool.

    Programming our New Robot

    Programming our New Robot By Tycho, Caitlin, Ethan, and Jayesh

    Task: Program our new mecanum wheel driving platform

    Now that our new robot has been built with a mecanum wheel platform, we can start write our drive code and figure out how to make our robot preform three basic motions: forwards and backwards, side-to-side and to rotate. We decided that, in order to get the best understanding of our robot, how it moves and our code, that we would try to write our drive code through trial and error. However, we did reference some guides written by other various FTC and FRC teams if we got stuck on something and needed to figure out where to start in solving the problem.

    Reflections

    In order to drive our mecanum wheels properly, we need to first discuss how each wheel is placed on the robot, and also how each wheel needs to move in respect to the others in order move in a certain direction. Each wheel has small rollers that point 45 degrees off of the larger wheel itself. In order to properly set up mecanum wheels, the rollers on each wheel have to point towards the center of the robot.

    This is important, because if these wheels are not pointing in the proper direction, then the rollers will begin to fight against each other, causing strange driving patterns that aren't very useful. We learned this the hard way, because when reconstructing the wheel mounts, the positions of two wheels on robot were flipped, causing the robot to drive in circles when we tried to drive sideways.

    The main reason we decided to go with mecanum wheels is because they open so many different ways to navigate the field. Robots that properly use mecanum wheels can not only go forwards, backwards and turn, but they can also make a robot move side to side. These three types of movement can be mixed with each other to do even cooler things like move in diagonals or even strafe, which is when a robot moves in an arc while moving sideways. Of course, we cannot use mecanum wheels to their full potential if we do not first understand the first three basic types of movement. Driving forwards and backwards is pretty simple, and it's the same as any other robot; all of the wheels have to move in the same direction. Turning also remains unchanged from other platforms; the left side of the robot has to move one way, and the right side of the robot has to move the other.

    However, moving side to side is not really intuitive compared to the others. In order to move side to side, the wheels on either side have to move opposite of each other. For example, if I wanted to, from a top-down perspective, drive to the right, the wheels on the left side of the robot would have to drive away from each other, while the wheels on the right side of the robot would have to drive towards each other. The rollers start spinning away from the center and to the right on the left side of the robot, or towards the center and to the right for the right side of the robot. The forwards and backwards components of the wheels and the rollers cancel each other out, and the robot moves to the right.

    Launching Mechanisms

    Launching Mechanisms By Ethan

    Task: To build a launching mechanism for the particles

    For the 2016-2017 season, particle scoring is really important. During autonomous, balls that are launched into the center vortex earn 15 points each, and balls that are launched into the center vortex earn 5 points. If done quickly enough, the particle scoring can negate most of the advantages another team has - just 8 particles scored during the driver-controlled period is equivalent to scoring all 4 beacons. With a good scoring mechanism, the only thing that your team must contend with is the other team scoring autonomous beacons and/or moving the cap ball off of the field.

    So, we must seriously consider all of our launching options. We narrowed our options down quickly:

    • Slingshot - Easy to make, but wouldn't hold up
    • Air launcher/Pneumatics - With our team, bad idea waiting to happen
    • Crossbow - Dangerous, but accurate.
    • Flywheel launcher - Accurate, requires least maintenance, but huge battery load
    • Catapult - Less accurate, but simple and powerful
    Of these options, we narrowed it down to the Flywheel and Catapult

    Flywheel

    Above is an example of a fully functional flywheel. The pros of that design are that it is efficient, accurate, and requires little upkeep. On the other hand, it needs at least 2 motors unless someone is willing to do gear witchcraft. As well, two extra motors will drain the battery (bigly), as we learned from last year's mountain climber. Finally, it can take up quite a bit of space on the robot and weigh it down a lot.
    Also, my initial model of it did not function well.

    Catapult

    We had trouble deciding on a catapult design. Initially, we were considering a more complicated flipper design, but after seeing our sister team's struggle with their design, we decided on a simpler, bungee cord design. The pros of this design are accuracy, simplicity, and strength, but the cons are that it isn't *as* accurate and that the elastic band will need to be replaced.

    The coolest thing about this design is that it can be simulated before I change anything, using a catapult simulator. A sample of our catapult can be found here.

    Reflections

    This add-on is the first of many that we must make to prepare for competition. Next, on the build list, we need to create a capping attachment and intake system. In the future, we should probably speed up our development process if we are to head to the Arkansas regional tournament.

    Launching Mechanisms Pt. 2

    Launching Mechanisms Pt. 2 By Ethan

    Task: To improve upon launching mechanism designs

    Catapult

    First and foremost, we now have one completely functional, terrifying, catapult. The motor mechanism is cannibalized from our sister team's attempt at a catapult, which broke apart on testing.


    Flywheel
    So, while we don't have a functional flywheel as of yet, we have done the math in order to get it up and working on the first try.

    For reference, we need to launch the ball ~1 meter, the frequency of the motor is 2.53 s^-1, and the radius of our gear is 2.65cm.
    velocityfinal^2 = velocityinitial^2 + 2*acceleration*change in y
    velocityfinal = sqrt(2*9.8m/s^2*1m)
    velocityfinal = sqrt(19.6m^2/s^2)
    velocityfinal = 4.427 m/s

    actual final velocity = 4.427 * 1.25 = 5.534m/s
    actual final velocity = 2*pi*radius*frequency
    (5.534m/s)/(2*pi*2.53s^-1) = .348m

    gear ratio = gear1radius/gear2radius = 2.65/.348 = 1:7.615
    However, for simplicity, our needed gear ratio is 1:8.

    Reflections

    We should advance in building our attachments - if we go to Arkansas, we have <6 practices to go. And, from now on, we need to do the math behind them so we know we're doing them right.

    Intake System Improvements

    Intake System Improvements By Caitlin and Janavi

    Task: Replace rubber bands with smaller versions and add wider intake area

    New intake area is wider than before


    At the Scrimmage we noticed that the rubber bands would get tangled as they rubbed against the underside of the catapult bowl, and so didn't reach as far down at the bottom. We untangled them before each match but decided to test out the smaller ones when we had the chance at practice. We were planning on adding a wider area for intake with some circles of treads and rubber bands, but with the long rubber bands they just got completely tangled in each other. So this practice we replaced the long rubber bands with the shorter versions and looked at differences

    Reflections

    It took a little while to physically pull out and replace each band, but the rubber bands we use are stiff enough that they can be pulled thin enough to slip in without getting twisted up. The single conveyor with the smaller rubber bands wasn't any noticeably worse than the same conveyor with longer ones, and our load rate stayed pretty much the same. We then added the smaller side brushes/spinners on that axle. Originally the longer rubber bands tangled up and threatened to break the belt, but this made it easier for Tycho and Omar to score. The added wheels on the axle make the intake area almost as large as the robot, stretching from wheel to wheel.

    Designing Button Pusher

    Designing Button Pusher By Darshan and Omar

    Task: Design potential beacon scoring mechanism

    Up to this point, we hadn't given much attention to a beacon scoring mechanism that we could use in both autonomous and tele-op. At the scrimmage we learned that scoring the beacons was almost vital to winning the match, and we couldn't do that. We rigged up a short u-channel on a plate and attached it to our robot, hoping we could just ram into the wall and it would work. It didn't. We started designing potential button pushers. We figured a servo would have enough power and saw a few robots using either a large flat plate or some type of wheel to score the beacons. We thought that a hard-foam wheel would work best, but aren't entirely sure how we would mount it with our limited space, so we'll have to see what best fits our needs and capabilities.

    Reflections

    Whatever our solution is for this problem, with our first qualifier really soon, we have to come up with it quickly. We realize that if we plan to be a contender for the top seed, we need to be a consistent beacon scorer.

    Arkansas Analysis

    Arkansas Analysis By Caitlin, Omar, Darshan, Jayesh, Evan, Max, Tycho, Janavi, and Ethan

    Task: Analyze what went wrong and right at Arkansas

    We spent a good hour and a half analyzing what we needed to do differently at upcoming competitions, and how to better prepare in the upcoming school break.

    Notes

    Mechanical:

    • Anti static spray
    • Shorten wires and close wire ends
    • Stabilize USB connections to controllers
    • Cap Ball lift

    Competition:

    • Driver Practice!!
    • Organize sub teams during competition
    • Scouting more and building connections
    • Stay aware and alert, no zoning out while in the pits especially
    • Line up robot based on tile mat seams
    • Control Award checklist done beforehand
    • RV shifts, no more than 1 onboard at a time

    Presentation and Presence:

    • Mechanical demos
    • Videos of demos easily available if robot stops cooperating
    • Team costume and cart chariot
    • RV video PSA - Pay it Forward
    • Be more active on Twitter and link videos to judges
    • Have a fundraiser in the neighborhood

    Reflections

    The Arkansas competition taught us a lot about the system of success for this years competition. We are ahead in terms of progress relative to other years, now we can focus on scoring elements like the cap ball, along with the presentation.

    Wylie East Postmortem

    Wylie East Postmortem By Ethan

    Task: Analyze what we did wrong and right at Wylie

    At Wylie, we did decently. We were mildly surprised that we actually qualified for regionals, but we did, so that's pretty nice.

    Mechanical Problems

    • Static shocks
    • Catapult reliability
    • Program unpredictability
    • Autonomous issues

    Others

    • We need to be more motivated
    • We need to practice driving

    Forester Field House Robotics Competition

    Forester Field House Robotics Competition By Janavi, Omar, Tycho, Max, Jayesh, Evan, Caitlin, and Darshan

    Task: Compete in the Forester Field House Robotics Competition

    We started off with our presentation pretty early, and everything was going pretty well until our robot had a static issue, and stopped working. We were able to cover it up pretty well without the judges noticing. One of the judges seemed to like our rap, and was interested in seeing the R.V. Our presentation ran a little long and cut into our question asking time. But other than that the presentation went pretty well. As for scouting, Evan and Omar went around and talked to all the teams, we even created flyers them to pass out the all the teams.

    We created a common excel sheet that we all shared on the google drive so everyone could scout when they got time. This time we actually put on shields in advance, and they weren’t made of duct tape! But we also had to replace the core power distribution module. And to do that we had to take off the shields. This resulted in us scrambling at the last minute to reattach the shields while rolling the robot over to the field. We replaced the CPDM because in the past it has been constantly resetting, and seems to have a faulty U.S.B connection. Replacing the CPDM as well as spraying staticide in between match really helped to improve our reliability during the matches. This resulted in us winning the rest of the matches. We ended up in 5th place. During the Alliance Selection we were the first pick of the first alliance captain. During the semifinals around 9 beacons had stopped working and the judges had resorted to holding up spoons with flags when the beacon button was pushed. In the end our alliance won and we also got the second place inspire award. This meant that if we hadn’t advanced already we would have had advanced during this completion.

    Reflections

    All in all we’re pretty happy with the results of this competition, our robot was more reliable than it usually is and we were able to completely stress test it. We believe the improved reliability was the result of replacing our CPDM and the improved side shields. We may have damaged our previous one simply through electrostatic discharge, ironically making us more susceptable to ESD in our other matches. Decreasing the conductive materials on the outside by properly blocking them with shields will make us more reliable in the future. Next time we need to make a complete check list so we don't forget the import things, like staticide.

    Judging and Awards

    Judging and Awards By Caitlin, Jayesh, Omar, Tycho, and Max

    Task: Increase chances to advance in judging

    In our competitions we really can't rely on our robot performing as well as it does in practice and our sparring matches with Imperial. If we're going to increase our chances of advancing from Regionals to Super-Regionals 90% of the time it's going to be from judging. We've always had rocky presentations in my opinion, but this year we're getting our energy up and trying to get everyone more interactive. We've heard that the organizers are having trouble getting enough judges, so it's likely the judges will be a little inexperienced. We're making a colored tab and blurb for each award to place at the front of our journal. We'll have a little paragraph on why we think we should be considered for each award, followed by a handful of key posts we believe back up our claim. Each award has a color, each post gets a number, and we place colored tabs (think these post-it flags) with a number written on the printed page.

    Reflections

    Judges don't have much time to inspect pages before a presentation, so it's the job of the first person who goes in to give the journal, a presentation copy (or 2 depending on the table space), and a short description of what's going on. This includes reference pages such as the awards and a copy of our scouting flier. Judges mostly listen and take notes during a presentation, so we don't want to overload them with pages to look at initially, but have enough information available to look through at the main judges meeting. The easier it is for a judge to get a sense of our team, the higher likelihood they will mention us in award considerations. This is a hard balance to strike, but the tabs served us well last year and I should have gotten them together again a while ago. Jayesh and Omar went through our tag page, picking the key ones to bring up. Tycho and Max continued working on their technical posts.

    Super Regionals Booth Design

    Super Regionals Booth Design By Caitlin, Austin, and Omar

    Task: Design a theme and layout for super regional pits

    A year or two ago Imperial advanced to Super Regionals, bringing along a few Iron Reign members. While teams get excited and have a lot of fun at Regionals, it's nothing compared to the displays found at super regionals. We've grown into our cyber-Roman theme this season, and Omar is currently working on a logo to match our new color and feel. Hats won't be enough at this level though, we've got to step it up a notch! Austin and I first looked for a base image, first looking up Roman forts, then moving to campsites. The forts weren't as recognizable, and the tents could be set up much easier. We drew most of our inspiration for the booth theme from the image above, credit to Gaius Hibernicus on Flickr.

    Having a recognizable theme is important on two points: scouting and sponsors. Sponsors are more likely to be generous if we can point to a display and show them that people will look at our setup and see their names on it. It's the way to thank them for their generosity in the season. When scouting, you want to be remembered. A forgettable team isn't chosen. Super Regionals usually has teams that have already made alliances over the season, so if you aren't one of those, you've got to stand out in both the game and in the pits.

    Reflections

    Oddly, this competition has a pit size of 9'x9', not the usual 10'x10', so we will be designing to that measurement, and hopefully expanding it later. Austin designed a base frame structure in SketchUp and I started making models of our carts, banners, and tables to be arranged after. We need enough sign space to display our Inspire banner, sponsors, school banner, and team aquila. The robot cart needs a clear path to the workspace area, and we need space up front for pins, a display with our outreach and robot reveal running, and a trophy display. I've made models for these because we already have them, and have begun the shuffling and brainstorming.

    Austin created a Roman style shield in a record time, using old field mats as the core and sawed off broom handles (left over from the hats) to keep them stiff. We ran out of daylight to scrub them clean of dirt, but did that this practice. When we were sure the tape would adhere he covered the front in red duct tape with a gold border. He also mounted an IKEA bowl to the front as decoration, and is planning to round the corners off so he can mount a LED strip along the edge. It already looks really impressive, and we have more materials to make a second if we keep the pace up.

    The structural design of the tent was adjusted for simplicity's sake; we're making a cube as large as the competition allows, and hanging tan fabric/ripstop nylon along the different sides to create the tent shape. The PVC supports are going to be wrapped in a worn/tea-stained look material to keep it unified. Our two smaller rolling carts will have our front displays, and since they have shelving, they can serve as storage for the boxes that don't need to get pulled out as often during the competition. We can mount a shield to the front if we want to cover them up. The Inspire banner is bright enough that it can likely be seen easily from the back or side of the tent, the school banner will go across the top above everything, and the aquila will likely go in the front on the left, beside the displays.

    Dallas Women in STEM

    Dallas Women in STEM By Caitlin, Tycho, Max, Jayesh, Janavi, Omar, and Austin

    Task: Teach LEGO EV3 and 3D modelling to girls

    Teaching Sumobots at #DallasWEST! #omgrobots #mobiletechxperience #dallascityoflearning

    A post shared by Iron Reign Robotics FTC (@team6832) on

    The Yale club of Dallas organized a STEM event for groups of girls in the city. We took the Mobile Tech XPerience out front for 3D modelling and set up 8 EV3s with laptops and a sumo field inside.

    Programming

    We led 6-8 girls at a time through the EV3 environment to make a basic sumo program, going through a tournament, and then a final grand melee at the end of the sessions. A couple had experience with EV3, more with Vex, but this session was a lot of their first experiences with programming and robots. Tycho taught the thought process of the program as we went through the steps and I presented on a projector as he went, sometimes taking over talking when we needed breaks. The port view in the programming environment was a great tool to explain the color sensor's light intensity measurement as we could just ask everyone to plug in their bots and see how the numbers changed with the environment. The session was too short to really let them explore what they could do in the program, but we did give hints that the Power variable was something they could tweak. The girls that took the risks in their program generally found that option and won the round robin.

    Everyone in the room had a bunch of fun, chaperones included. One girl realized that she had a NXT at home, and now that she knew she could do cool stuff with it, she was excited to try it out. A lot of the teachers asked about the competition levels, and we're hopeful that some of the kids will join a FLL team and the 8th graders going to high school will look for a FTC or FRC team.

    Modelling

    For the first deployment in a while all 4 printers worked! We were able to print every single design from the day. A couple of the laptops don't have the correct export to STL option, but we were able to work around it by grabbing a flash drive and bringing the file over to a different one. The groups in each session were pretty small compared to the waves that normally come by in an expo, so we could spend a good amount of time making sure no-one was lost. Some people grabbed the wrong design when they came back, but we've gotten the swing of things and sent text notifications to the teachers pretty quickly. Since we were parked out front the groups passed us on the way out and picked up their keychains.

    Practice Laps

    Practice Laps By Omar, Jayesh, Tycho, Darshan, and Evan

    Task: Get some organized driving practice in before Supers

    With Superregionals drawing near, we thought it prudent to better organize ourselves in terms of driving teams. We've never felt that we were 100% solid, with people not knowing what to do at certain times in the match. For example, our "Coach" position was almost entirely dedicated to yelling out the match time in 10 second intervals. Today, we talked about our three different roles (Driver, Co-Driver, and Coach) and what each should do. We did several practice matches, rotating through positions each time just to gain practice in each.

    Reflections

    A large fault our team has always had is focusing too much on improving and working on the robot and not leaving enough time for driver practice. In the coming Spring Break week, we hope to meet several times in order to make sure our teamwork and communication is solid.

    Editing the Reveal Video

    Editing the Reveal Video By Evan and Omar

    One man's harrowing journey through copyright free music lists

    The Robot Reveal video is underway. With most of the filming done, the sky grows dark and the day ends. A night time of editing sets in for the poor miscreant who volunteered for the task. Huddled in the corner with a raw fish and his precious computer, the boy opens premiere pro to begin. All is right with the world. The five hour long dramatic saga of trying to figure out the dang code to his Adobe account is through and the password has been changed. He knew he never should have let his family use his student status for a discount. But it's over and he's decided to leave it in his past. Time to edit

    So the editing for the Robot Reveal video has begun and so far it's gone fine. I had an easy time getting it all in and except one crash(everything was recovered) it's been good. There won't be too much extreme editing to do. Nothing mind bending. Mostly cutting and arranging. The big problem now is finding a song to use that fits the video. I'm having trouble finding something pleasant sounding, fitting, un-copyrighted, and that lines up with the length of the video. I've been listening to a ridiculous amount of un-copyrighted music. An insane amount. It's not copyrighted for a reason. No man or woman or animal or object should have to endure this. The un-copyrighted playlists should be used as an enhanced interrogation technique and then banned by the UN for being a violation of basic human rights. Its all a bunch of extremely similar songs that should either be in the background of a shirtless guys vlog or the basis for an art students performance piece. A few outliers are some EDM and elevator music and I don't know which one makes me want to pour hot wax into my ear holes more. I'm listening to a song right as I'm writing this. I think it's the background music for the most generic cooking channel on YouTube ever. One way or another I'm going to get this done. Maybe I've made a few hyperboles throughout the post but the robot reveal will be finished. I've saved all the music I think could work into a playlist that I'll let everyone give a listen to at tomorrow's meeting. Now I must return to my hell.