Please help support our team! $25 buys a motor, $50 buys a new battery, $150 adds controllers and sensors, $500 pays tournament fees, $750 upgrades our drivetrain

Iron Reign

Welcome to Iron Reign at Dallas ISD's Science and Engineering Magnet

Articles by section: engineering

Finishing the Chassis

29 Apr 2018

Finishing the Chassis By Kenna and Janavi

Task: Build a Chassis

We have been working on this chassis, on and off, for over three months. Just about every part of it has been built, disassembled, and rebuilt more than twice. In out last post, we had thought the wheels were ready to go. However, various parts had been put on backwards or were unusable so we had to do everything over again. Once we had rebuilt, we realized that there were even more issues. So we fixed those and built them again. Both of us could probably assemble wheels, motors, and chains in our sleep.
Now that the robot has wheels, we started on attaching the REV expansion hub and battery. The chassis is square, but has an asymmetrical structure of tetrix bars. Attaching the battery was the simple part since previous version of the robot had a 3D-printed battery holder that would be screwed on. After a short search, we found it in a box of 3D-printed parts whose prime was long over. There was no way to effectively place the expansion hub on the tetrix rails. Instead, we attached a thin plank of wood to two parallel bars, drilled a couple holes, and screwed the hub on.
Overall, it is a very no-frills chassis. We had to cut most of the side shields off because they were becoming more of an obstruction than an aid. Though it was a pain to build and rebuild every aspect of the chassis, we gained a lot of building experience out of one robot. We chose a relatively difficult design to built for the first time but, in the end, it was functional and that's all we can really ask for.

Next Steps

Though the physical robot has been built, it has no code. Both of us will be learning how to program a basic pushbot.

Position Tracking

18 Jul 2018

Position Tracking By Abhi

Task: Design a way to track the robot's location

Throughout the Relic Recovery season, we have had many issues with the autonomous being inaccurate simply because the scoring was dependent on perfectly aligning the robot on the balancing stone. This was prone to many issues as evidenced by numerous matches in which our autonomous failed. Thus far, we had relied on the encoders on the mecanum chassis to input distances and such. Though this worked to a significant degree, the bot was still prone to loss from drift and running into the glyph pit. We don't know if glyphs will be reused or not but we definitely needed a better tracking mechanism on the field to be more efficient.

After some investigation online and discussing with other teams, I thought about a way to make a tracker. For the sake of testing, we built a small chassis with two perpendicular REV rails. Then, with the help of new trainees for Iron Reign, we attached two omni wheels on opposite sides of the chassis, as seen in the image above. To this, we added axle encoders to track the movement of the omni wheels.

The reason the axles of these omnis was not dependent of any motors was because we wanted to avoid any error from the motors themselves. By making the omni wheels free spinning, no matter what the encoder reads on the robot, the omni wheels will always move whichever direction the robot is moving. Therefore, the omni wheels will generally give a more accurate reading of position.

To test the concept, we attached the apparatus to ARGOS. With some upgrades to the ARGOS code by using the IMU and omni wheels, we added some basic trigonometry to the code to accurately track the position. The omni setup was relatively accurate and may be used for future projects and robots.

Next Steps

Now that we have a prototype to track position without using too many resources, we need to test it on an actual FTC chassis. Depending on whether or not there is terrain in Rover Ruckus, the use of this system will change. Until then, we can still experiment with this and develop a useful multipurpose sensor.

Technicbots Chassis Project - July Meeting

22 Jul 2018

Technicbots Chassis Project - July Meeting By Kenna, Ethan, Charlotte, Karina, Shaggy, and Abhi

Task: Compare & Collaborate on Chassis

At Big Thought's offices in downtown Dallas, three teams met. Technicbots (Team 8565), EFFoRT (Team 8114), Schim Robotics (12900), and Iron Reign are all part of Technicbots' Chassis Project. The goal is for each team to create any number of chassis and improve their building skills by learning from the other teams.

The meeting began with an overview of all teams' progress. Each team presented their thought process and execution when creating each bot and discussed why/how everything was done. At the end, we all reviewed the rule changes for the 2018-19 season. Once all questions had been asked and answered, testing began.

Austin Lui of Technicbots gets their chassis ready for testing.

Using leftover tiles from last season, we set up a small field in Big Thought's blue room. Technicbots provided a ramp to do enhanced testing with. All teams plan on testing:

  • Forward speed
  • 3 second turn
  • Up/Down ramp
  • Balancing stone
  • Weight-pulling
  • Straight line drift
  • 90/180° turn offset

Connor Mihelic of EFFoRT adds some finishing touches.

We know from Google Analytics that our website has about 200 visitors a month but we rarely meet the people who read and use our blog posts. Today, we got to meet the mentors of Team 12900 from a middle school in Plano, TX. When they and their students were starting out as a team, they utilized our tutorials and journal. Apparently their teams members are avid followers of our team, which was very meaningful to hear. Some non-FTC friends visited as well and were introduced to cartbot.


Terri and Grant Richards of Schim Robotics.

Next Steps

Using what we learned from the other teams, we will begin to improve all of our chassis. Most of them are at varying levels of completion so now we want to concentrate on getting all of them to the same level of functionality. Garchomp is, notably, the most behind so he will be getting the most attention from here on out.

Replay Autonomous

28 Jul 2018

Replay Autonomous By Arjun

Task: Design a program to record and replay a driver run

One of the difficulties in writing an autonomous program is the long development cycle. We have to unplug the robot controller, plug it into a computer, make a few changes to the code, recompile and download the code, and then retest our program. All this must be done over and over again, until the autonomous is perfected. Each autonomous takes ~4 hours to write and tune. Over the entire season, we spend over 40 hours working on autonomous programs.

One possible solution for this is to record a driver running through the autonomous, and then replay it. I used this solution on my previous robotics team. Since we had no access to a field, we had to write our entire autonomous at a competition. After some brainstorming, we decided to write a program to record our driver as he ran through our autonomous routine and then execute it during a match. It worked very well, and got us a few extra points each match.

Using this program, writing an autonomous program is reduced to a matter of minutes. We just need to run through our autonomous routine a few times until weare happy with it, and then take the data from the console and paste it into our program. Then we recompile the program and run it.

There are two parts to our replay program. One part (a Tele-op Opmode) records the driver's motions and outputs it into the Android console. The next part (an Autonomous Opmode) reads in that data, and turns it into a working autonomous program.

Next Steps

Our current replay program requires one recompilation. While it is very quick, one possible next step is to save the autonomous data straight into the phone's internal memory, so that we do not have to recompile the program. This could further reduce the time required to create an autonomous.

One more next step could be a way to easily edit the autonomous. The output data is just a big list of numbers, and it is very difficult to edit it. If we need to tune the autonomous due to wear and tear on the robot, it is difficult to do so without rerecording. If we can figure out a mechanism for editing the generated autonomous, we can further reduce the time we spend creating autonomous programs.

Contact Us

E-Mail: ironreignrobotics@gmail.com Website: In the address bar